Monthly Archives: April 2011

Writers Reflect on Reading: Part Two

I am certain that everyone has stories. I’m equally convinced that everyone is capable of writing these stories up into novels, short stories, articles, letters, notes, emails, blogs, texts, bumper stickers, billboards, songs, or graffiti. Writing is the legacy of…

Writers Reflect on Reading

Recently I wrote a list of books that influenced my writing and I thought it would be interesting to pose a question to this writing group.  Tell me about a book or author that inspires your writing.  The Guttery responses…

Refresh Your Memory

It’s happened again. Another best selling memoir exposed as a fraud? We don’t know all the details yet, but according to reputable sources like “60 Minutes” and writer John Krakauer, the blockbuster <Three Cups of Tea, by Greg Mortensen may…

Impossible Objects: using ambiguity to create depth, breadth & variety in poetry

David Cooke starts the discussion which will continue at The Last Monday Reading Series. It begins at 7pm at Influence Music Hall 134 SE 3rd Street in Hillsboro. Using the analogy of a Necker’s Cube Cooke illuminates the dynamic use of language by poets. Readers are often turned off to poetry because of the perception that poets are creating a code that needs to be broken. That poets load their poems up with obscurity and ambiguity to make it a poem. Poems are cryptic, dense, and obtuse on purpose to confound readers and make the poet seem more intelligent. Cooke posits that some of this confusion is a result of attempts to harness the ambiguity of language. Ambiguity being the primary and defining characteristic of poetry. “Often poetry is like Russia. It is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma. I believe poets do not do this on purpose. They don’t write poetry as if it is a page out of Where’s Waldo or the hidden pictures of Highlights Magazine.”